Check out the Hehnly Lab's Newest Paper in Molecular Biology of the Cell! And, we got the cover!!!

by Heidi Hehnly in


Our studied title “ Chromosome misalignment is associated with PLK! activity at cenexin-positive mitotic centrosomes” is now officially published. Check it out here. This project was led by the Hehnly lab’s graduate student Erica Colicino who now is at University of Michigan doing her postdoctoral work with Puck Ohi’s lab. Erin Curtis a postbac scholar in the Hehnly lab and now a graduate student at Duke designed the cover that was selected and made major contributions to the study.

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Michelle Nunez-Garcia giving a great lecture on the benefits between Widefield microscopy and Laser Scanning Confocal

by Heidi Hehnly in , ,


Michelle, an undergraduate in our lab, gave a great lecture this past week on the pluses and minuses of widefield and laser scanning confocal microscopy in our graduate level course at SU on Microscopy Techniques in Cell Biology. She presented one of my favorite papers by Jason Swedlow that really digs into the advantages of widefield imaging with deconvolution for resolving dim fluorescent structures in live samples. The paper was titled “Measuring tubulin content in Toxoplasma gondii: A comparison of laser-scanning confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy” and can be found here.

Michelle presenting on Widefield Microscopy with deconvolution using the model organism Toxoplasma Gondii.

Michelle presenting on Widefield Microscopy with deconvolution using the model organism Toxoplasma Gondii.


Congrats to Erica Colicino for her cover at Cytoskeleton

by Heidi Hehnly in ,


Check out Erica’s recent publication in Cytoskeleton titled “Regulating a key mitotic regulator, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1)”. You can find the article here. Here’s her beautiful cover below, which is a Structured Illumination Microscopy Micrograph of PLK1 (Fire Look-up Table) and kinetochores (CREST, white) during different stages of the cell cycle.

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"The balance between adhesion and contraction during cell division"

by Heidi Hehnly in , ,


Check out the beautiful review titled “The balance between adhesion and contraction during cell division” from Dylan Burnette’s lab, specifically Nilay Taneja, that my graduate student, Lindsay Rathbun, and I were lucky to contribute to. Featured below is a stunning Figure Nilay put together. It’s fantastic and shows the power of Structured Illumination Microscopy.

Figure 1.  (a)  Structured illumination microscopy micrograph of HeLa cell at  metaphase , stained for α-tubulin (yellow),  actin filaments  (magenta) and  myosin  IIA (cyan). The  mitotic spindle  comprises spindle microtubules, that facilitate  chromosome segregation  and dictate furrow positioning, and  astral microtubules  that play a pivotal role in spindle positioning by interacting with the  actin  cortex. Myosin II is uniformly distributed at the cortex during metaphase.  (b)  Upon  anaphase  onset, myosin II is enriched at the equator to ingress the  cleavage furrow . Note the extensive contacts between the mitotic spindle and the contractile cortex, suggesting cross-talk between these two  cytoskeletal  networks. Note that the actin bundles protruding from the cells are not retraction fibers, as they are not attached to the substrate. Scale bar: 10 μm.

Figure 1. (a) Structured illumination microscopy micrograph of HeLa cell at metaphase, stained for α-tubulin (yellow), actin filaments (magenta) and myosin IIA (cyan). The mitotic spindle comprises spindle microtubules, that facilitate chromosome segregation and dictate furrow positioning, and astral microtubules that play a pivotal role in spindle positioning by interacting with the actin cortex. Myosin II is uniformly distributed at the cortex during metaphase. (b) Upon anaphase onset, myosin II is enriched at the equator to ingress the cleavage furrow. Note the extensive contacts between the mitotic spindle and the contractile cortex, suggesting cross-talk between these two cytoskeletal networks. Note that the actin bundles protruding from the cells are not retraction fibers, as they are not attached to the substrate. Scale bar: 10 μm.