Hehnly Lab has a paper at Molecular Biology of the Cell!

by Heidi Hehnly in


Colicino et al. talks about the role of Gravin anchoring PLK1 at mitotic centrosomes. This anchor is important for regulating centrosome organization and function as seen below with super resolution imaging of the centrosome component CEP215 disorganization when Gravin is lost. 

A panel taken from Figure 4 from Colicino et al. of CEP215 disorganization primarily at a single mitotic spindle pole with Gravin loss.  We argue this is through uncontrolled phosphorylation of CEP215 by PLK1 in the absence of Gravin.

A panel taken from Figure 4 from Colicino et al. of CEP215 disorganization primarily at a single mitotic spindle pole with Gravin loss.  We argue this is through uncontrolled phosphorylation of CEP215 by PLK1 in the absence of Gravin.


ASCB 2017

by Heidi Hehnly in ,


Erica Colicino and Lindsay Rathbun (Hehnly Lab Graduate students) did a great job at their posters this year! Presenting on the role of Gravin and PLK1 in centrosome function (Erica) and Spindle and cleavage furrow positioning during embryonic patterning (Lindsay).

Erica Colicino presenting her poster.

Erica Colicino presenting her poster.

Lindsay Rathbun at her poster.

Lindsay Rathbun at her poster.

And we found a delicious speakeasy!

And we found a delicious speakeasy!

We got to see some old friends (Hui-Fang Hung).

We got to see some old friends (Hui-Fang Hung).

And great talks by our new faculty member Dr. Jessica Henty-Ridilla!

And great talks by our new faculty member Dr. Jessica Henty-Ridilla!


Congrats Hui-Fang Hung!

by Heidi Hehnly


Cenexin controls centrosome positioning during cell migration, is required for spindle orientation, lumen formation, and controls the above activities by modulating MT organization and stability

Cenexin controls centrosome positioning during cell migration, is required for spindle orientation, lumen formation, and controls the above activities by modulating MT organization and stability


Hehnly Laboratory start date July 1st 2015

by Heidi Hehnly in ,


Heidi Hehnly's Laboratory will open its doors this summer on July 1st 2015 at SUNY Upstate Medical School in scenic upstate New York.  The Hehnly lab will focus primarily on the interface between membrane traffic and cytoskeletal dynamics throughout the cell cycle, and how this is important in understanding polarity formation and thus organ development and maintenance. 

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